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Canon Printers Old Model

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Starwriter word-processors:

Long out of production, but popular with older users (including vicars) who prefer to have their Starwriters fixed rather than tangle with Windows XP, Windows Vista and Intel.

The low-profile Starwriters share the print unit with the portable BJC printers, while the more bulky ones have a different print unit that uses a combined print head and black ink tank.

Faults: can include faulty print head, perished belt on the floppy drive, fading LCD display, tired keyboard (these are mostly faults of age). No user-serviceable parts inside other than the print head.

BJC printers.Long obsolete but some users like to have them fixed as they were quite sturdy. BJC- portables seem popular.

S200: Cheap as chips printer with black & 3-colour ink tanks. Prone to head blockage if third-party inks used. Only suitable for light duties. Not worth repairing if it goes wrong.

S300: Cheap printer with black & 3-colour ink tanks. Prone to head blockage if third-party inks used. Only suitable for light duties. Not worth repairing if it goes wrong.

S330P: Cheap as chips photo printer with black & 3-colour ink tanks. Prone to head blockage if third-party inks used. Only suitable for light duties. Not worth repairing if it goes wrong.

S520: Mid- range printer with 4 separate ink tanks, now obsolete.

S750: Mid- range printer with 4 separate ink tanks, now obsolete.

S900: Photo printer with 6 separate ink tanks, now obsolete

S9000: A3 photo printer, with 6 separate ink tanks, still used by photographic professionals who use them heavily. Common fault: ink absorber full!

I250, i350: Cheap printer with black & 3-colour ink tanks. Prone to head and purge blockage if third-party inks used. Only suitable for light duties. Not worth repairing if it goes wrong.

I550: Mid-range printer with 4 separate ink tanks. Now obsolete. Seemed more prone than most to Black nozzle blockage.

I560: Mid-range printer with 4 separate ink tanks. Now obsolete. Seemed more prone than most to Black nozzle blockage.

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I9100: Replacement for S9000 and little changed. Some nearly-new models had a problem with a pipe falling off inside, which produced the same symptoms as a failing print head. If this happens to you, don’t buy a print head (expensive). get a service centre to investigate the fault.

i70: Portable printer, popular with businesses. Came with a power adapter that worked on 100 to 240 volts supplies. Now dropping out of use. The ink tanks are very small, but not cheap, and the ink absorber will soon become full if it is used heavily. Was prone to expensive damage caused by small objects falling inside. (Make sure that the tiny screw inside the front flaps at left is not loose!) It appeared that using third-party inks in these was a very bad idea, as I saw scores of them which had blocked up to the point where only serious technician attention would get the ink flowing again.

i80: Portable printer, popular with businesses. Replacement for i70, and not much changed. The ink tanks are very small, but not cheap, and the ink absorber will soon become full if it is used heavily. Was prone to expensive damage caused by small objects falling inside. (Make sure that the tiny screw inside the front flaps at left is not loose!) It appeared that using third-party inks in these was a very bad idea, as I saw scores of them which had blocked up to the point where only serious technician attention would get the ink flowing again.

ip90: Portable printer, popular with businesses. Re-styled replacement for i80. The ink tanks are very small, but not cheap, and the ink absorber will soon become full if it is used heavily. Expect it to be prone to expensive damage caused by small objects falling inside. As with its predecessors, expect that using third-party inks in these will be a very bad plan.

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PIXMAS.Canon used this trademark for their 2004-2005 output, but seem to have dropped it again for the latest models.

Cheapest models only suitable for light duty.

Other models from iP3000 upwards not bad so long as you use the genuine Canon ink. Have a lot of features (including CD printing and full duplex printing) for the money. Internally, they are rather over-complicated and awkward to work on compared with earlier models.

Problems: overall no less reliable than earlier models. The closable top flap is supposed to stop foreign-object jams, but any foreign objects that do get inside require considerable dismantling to get rid of them. The CD printing generated complaints (but keeping the tray clean and turning off the white disk detecting feature should help). The CD printing tray seems designed for light duty only (video pirates please note) . Inexperience users seemed to get caught out by the bottom tray feature: if you try to print from the wrong tray, nothing will happen except a loud clanking, and the only way out is to put paper in the selected tray.

There were almost no complaints about the duplex printing mechanism (maybe the customers never used it).

Data card printers, e.g. iP6000D.

Not bad so long as you use the genuine Canon inks. Customers had problems with the card slots – mainly bent pins. We don’t know why – but keeping your child away, and inserting the cards carefully would be good. With the current data card printers, the multiplicity of card formats clearly causes confusion. Some of the half-dozen card formats listed as usable require an adaptor.

ip8500: Has 8 ink tanks, with red and green added to increase the colour gamut. The green ink apparently dries very readily causing the green nozzles to block up. We could never see what difference the red and green made to the prints, and it seems that the users couldn’t either, as they almost never complained about the missing green.

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i9950 (USA = i9900). A3 printer with the same head as the ip8500, but curiously having the ink tanks in a slightly different order. Has 8 ink tanks, with red and green added to increase the colour gamut. The green ink apparently dries very readily causing the green nozzles to block up. We could never see what difference the red and green made to the prints, and it seems that the users couldn’t either, as they almost never complained about the missing green. Over-complicated replacement for the i9100 and S9000.

2005/2006 Canon range (iP1600 etc.)The entry level models now use combined print head/ink tank assemblies. These printers appear suitable for light duties only.

2005/2006 Canon range (ip4200, ip5200, ip6600D etc.).These use a new active ink tank which is not interchangeable with earlier tanks. This is obviously intended to discourage customers from using third-party and refill inks. Did not see any third-party inks, and curiously no head blockage problems either.

Problems: Saw several cases of an ink tank flashing and refusing to let the printer print, even though there was ink in the tank. Solution – change the tank.

You should not ship these active-ink-tank printers for service with the ink tanks removed, as (unlike all the earlier models) these printers sense missing tanks and refuse to perform any further operations. The result is that the printer is inevitably shipped with ink still in the print head and exposed to the air by reason of the head not being parked. The ink starts to dry up, and when the printer is fitted with ink tanks and put to work, the user has to waste ink cleaning the print head.